The Marvelous Land Of Oz


The s Top 25 nine-word movie quotes Photos Add Image Add an image Do you have any images for this title? Learn more More Like This. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz Video Ozma of Oz Video The Emerald City of Oz Video The Gnome King is still seething with desire for revenge on Dorothy and her friends The Wonderful Wizard of Oz — Edit Cast Cast overview, first billed only: Dorothy voice George Morris Tinman voice Neil Shee Lion voice Richard M Dumont Scarecrow voice as Richard Dumont Steven Bednarski Edit Did You Know?

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Jinnicky the Red Jinn Kabumpo. Adaptations and other derivative works. Back to Oz Retrieved from " https: Frank Baum Musical film stubs Oz stubs. Musical theatre articles missing an image in infobox All stub articles. Even with that being said, the favorite parts of this read were the sections where the Tin Man and Scarecrow are the stars: So if you enjoyed the classic movie, give this a try; it is worth the read. View all 3 comments. Both than your memory of this stuff, and even than the first Oz book.

You've got the Scarecrow set up, "brains" and all having gone to his head, as King Fool of Emerald City, you've got an antifeminist caricature not that i mind it when it's so transparent, even for a kid in this modern era taking over Oz and making the men do housework, you've got the Tin Man fallen into vanity and obsessed with nickel-plating himself, you've got sudden gender-switching, a roly-poly that sp So. You've got the Scarecrow set up, "brains" and all having gone to his head, as King Fool of Emerald City, you've got an antifeminist caricature not that i mind it when it's so transparent, even for a kid in this modern era taking over Oz and making the men do housework, you've got the Tin Man fallen into vanity and obsessed with nickel-plating himself, you've got sudden gender-switching, a roly-poly that spouts horrible puns, and even an animated flying machine made out of an animal head and household furniture that really just wants to be dead.

I wish I hadn't given the first book 5 stars, because this one really is a cut above as the profound weirdness of Baum's mind really starts experimenting, all done in that same manically episodic style that works so well for Baum just as it did for Carroll. Everything in life is unusual until you get accustomed to it. I've read The Wonderful Wizard of Oz sometime last year and really enjoyed it , and I have to say that this book was a pretty damn good sequel to it. I enjoyed being introduced to new characters, as well as following new adventures of old characters.

The plot was quite enjoyable as well, and they even were a couple of twists that I did not see coming. All in all, a pretty solid book, and I can't wait to continue on with the series. Sep 15, Cecilia rated it liked it. This book is slightly ridiculous. In this, the second book in the Oz series, The Scarecrow, the Tin Man, and Glinda return for the festivities with a random assortment of friends, enemies, and obstacles. Their adventures are interesting if silly and laden with puns my god the puns, some make you giggle, some make you want to rip your eyes out. The end though, is great, especially in the gender-swapping tolerance and the surprisingly just outcome of who gets to rule Oz.

This is the second volume of this series that I read on my holiday back in June. A lovely first of this specific edition of the book. Charming line drawings and coloured illustrations by Biro accompanied by a whole series of characters both old and new made it a pleasant enough drift back into the frankly odd-ball Land of Oz. It is once again a series of loosely knit adventures of the Tin-Man and the Scarecrow though here joined by a little farmboy called Tip, also a creature made from sticks and This is the second volume of this series that I read on my holiday back in June.

It is once again a series of loosely knit adventures of the Tin-Man and the Scarecrow though here joined by a little farmboy called Tip, also a creature made from sticks and a pumpkin called, fairly unimaginatively, Jack Pumpkinhead and a rather obnoxiously arrogant insect which through magnification and then displaying on a flat screen has magically come to life as a huge two dimensional opinion on legs.

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There is also a wooden horse, magicked to life and then towards the end of the book they create my favourite, a wonderful imaginary creature called a Gump which is constructed from all kinds of bits of furniture and vegetation and given life by the sprinkling on of a stolen magic powder.

This, I know, would have totally caught the imagination of my 10 year old self and, had I read it then, I would have been an Oz fan forever. Baum created some clever dialogue and arguments between the different characters which would enable the young reader to form a sense of each of them; or at least it did for this slightly be quiet older reader.

And it is that ability to empathize with and appreciate the musings of a totally fantastical character which is a great and necessary gift in any reader and Baum, in my opinion, definitely would have helped in its nurturing.

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So an hour passed away, during which the silence was only broken by the bubbling of the pot hissing on the flames. Where can I find this!? Fleeing Mombi, the trio runs for the Emerald City where they find an Oz ruled over by our familiar friend, the Scarecrow. To this day, however I still wonder what Baum was doing with the gender change in this book. Published April 2nd by Puffin Classics first published Really, regardless of Baum's stance on women's suffrage, I don't see why a good children's book has to be dragged through disgusting political mire. Want to Read saving….

Though the story is covering much the same as the original book yet it succeeds in layering the story, creating a new level of adventure and thus enabling Oz to mould itself into a real place with a real history. Having read these two children's books back to back I can well understand how Baum succeeded in creating for himself an army of fans who would follow whenever he led them back into the nuttiness that is Oz.

Oz: The Marvelous Land of Oz

Sep 19, Jason Pettus rated it liked it. Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted here illegally. This review covers all 14 of the Baum Oz books, which is why it's found on all 14 book pages here. I think it's fairly safe by now to assume that nearly everyone in Western society is familiar with The Wizard of Oz , most of us because of the classic movie adaptation; and many realize as well tha Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.

I think it's fairly safe by now to assume that nearly everyone in Western society is familiar with The Wizard of Oz , most of us because of the classic movie adaptation; and many realize as well that author L. Frank Baum ended up penning a whole series of sequels, because of the original book's astounding success back at the turn of the 20th century when it was first published -- 13 sequels altogether, before his death in , which after the movie's success twenty years later became a literal merchandising empire, spawning hundreds more official sequels by various authors and hundreds more unofficial ones once the characters moved into the public domain.

And like many others, I've always been interested in what these 14 "canonical" Oz books have to say; and that's why I decided this winter to sit down and read them all in a row for the first time, easy to do because of them being available for free at both Project Gutenberg and the email subscription service DailyLit which is how I myself read them, and in fact is how I read many of the older books you see reviewed here; I'm a big fan of theirs, and highly recommend them. But of course, to even approach these books with the right mindset, it's important to understand that like so many other one-hit-wonders, Baum was not only eluded by success in most of his other endeavors but was an active failure at them -- in the s, for example, he unsuccessfully tried his hand at breeding fancy poultry a national fad at the time , then in the s opened his own theatre and became one of the first-ever Americans to produce modern-style stage musicals, apparently a little too ahead of its time, then in the s moved to the Dakota Territory and opened a dry-goods store that eventually failed, as well as starting a newspaper that folded too.

So it was sort of a case of random lightning in a bottle when he decided in the late s to try his hand at children's literature, and ended up with his very first title being the most popular kid's book in America for two years straight, and no surprise that Baum then spent the rest of his life desperately trying to figure out how to bottle that lightning again. Because now that I've read it myself, I can confirm that the original Wonderful Wizard of Oz is astonishingly great, a sort of miraculous combination of traits that makes for an almost perfect children's story; and although most of it follows the same storyline seen in the '39 movie, there are also significant differences, making it worth your while to sit and read the book version if you have the interest.

And by the way, for some really interesting reading, check out the academic analysis that was done of this book in the s, arguing that most of its details symbolically correspond almost exactly to various political and economic issues of the late s, including the yellow brick road representing the much-discussed gold standard of that age, the scarecrow representing the then-hot Populist Party, Toto representing the teetotaler [prohibitionist: But of course, there are a couple of details about this book that have been forgotten over the decades too, which also help explain its record-shattering success -- it was an unusually lavish book for its time, for example, with two-toned illustrations on every page and several full-color plates, and let's also not forget that Baum himself mounted a Broadway-style musical of Oz just two years after the book was published, a huge hit which toured nationally for a decade and that was even more insanely popular than the book itself including making national stars out of vaudeville performers Fred Stone and David Montgomery, playing the Scarecrow and Tin Man; the stage production left out the Cowardly Lion altogether, which is why he is also barely seen in any of the 13 canonical sequels.

And so that's why when Baum attempted starting up other fantasy series in the wake of Oz 's success, hoping to turn all of them into lucrative franchises like the original, the audience mostly responded with yawns; and that's why Baum eventually went back to writing more and more Oz books as the 20th century continued, because by now the strength of the brand far outweighed the relative writing skills of Baum when it came to any particular volume.

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That's why, at least to adults, it's perhaps actually the introductions to each book that are the most fascinating thing about them; because to be frank, most of the books follow a pretty familiar formula, with a danger-filled quest involving various kooky characters that is usually finished about two-thirds of the way through, followed by a massive parade or party that lets Baum trot out the growing number of main characters added to this universe with each title.

And by the way, prepare yourself for Baum's unending love of the deus-ex-machina plot device; over half the books end along the lines of, "And then our heroes took possession of a super-duper magical device, which they waved in the air and all their troubles went away. By the end of the original 14 books, in fact, Baum had built up a virtual aristocracy of licensable characters, all of whom would have to be dragged out for a cameo at some point in each book to remind the audience of their existence -- not just the cast of the original book and '39 movie but also various other princesses like Ozma and Betsy Bobbin, boy characters like Ojo the Unlucky and Button Bright, adults who help them like the Shaggy Man, Cap'n Bill and Ugu the Shoemaker, and of course a whole litany of quirky fantastical sidekicks, including but not limited to Tik-Tok, Jack Pumpkinhead, the Great Jinjin, Billina the Angry Hen, Scraps the Patchwork Girl, and Polychrome the Rainbow Fairy.

And so did the Great Oz Merchandising Experiment keep limping along for two decades, with each sequel selling less and less and getting lazier and lazier for example, the tenth book in the series, 's Rinkitink in Oz , was actually a non-Oz book written a decade previous, published almost unchanged except for a hasty final chapter full of Oz regulars slapped onto the end ; and thus did Baum's bad luck in business come back with a vengeance as well, with three more Broadway productions that were all flops, and even the establishment of a film production company in that eventually went bankrupt.

You can see the progression of all this reflected in Baum's first-person introductions to each book, which like I said is why they might be the most fascinating parts of all for adult readers -- how in the first sequel, for example, he expresses legitimately gleeful surprise and joy at how passionate his fans were, and how thousands of children had literally written to him out of the blue demanding more Oz stories, while with each subsequent sequel his tone becomes more and more snarky, ala "Well, dear and wonderful children, you've yet again demanded another Oz book like the sheep you are, so here it is, you screeching little monsters.

So all in all, an experience I'm glad I had, reading all fourteen original Oz books in a row, but not something I'd recommend to others; instead, maybe better just to read the first, then skip to the sixth, then skip straight to the 14th, 's Glinda of Oz , because of its unusual darkness probably caused, many scholars agree, by Baum knowing that he was near death. As with many authors I've looked at here at CCLaP, history seems to have correctly adjusted itself in Baum's case, with most of his books now rightfully falling into the obscurity they deserve, even while his one true masterpiece is still rightfully recognized as such.

Don't read further if you haven't read to the end of book 1 since this review will spoil you about the events that took place in book 1. This book was awesome. I have to say that after book 1 I was puzzled what this book would be about and if I would like it as much as book 1 without Dorothy or the Cowardly Lion absent from the story.

However, this book I managed to even love more than book 1. We start off with the main protagonist Tip who carves himself a man made of wood with a head of a p Don't read further if you haven't read to the end of book 1 since this review will spoil you about the events that took place in book 1. We start off with the main protagonist Tip who carves himself a man made of wood with a head of a pumpkin in order to frighten his guardian, the witch Mombi.

Mombi soon deduces what Tip has done and using a bit of powder she haggled over brings the pumpkinhead to life and promises swift retribution to Tip by telling him she will turn him into a marble statue harshest punishment ever. Tip escapes and takes his 'son' Jack Pumpkinhead with him. Using some of the powder, Tip promptly brings a sawhorse to life and calls it Saw-Horse. I have to say that out of all of the characters I loved Saw-Horse. He got salty with everyone. And kept telling Jack how stupid he was. Bless his heart, Jack Pumpkinhead is not that smart.

Part of me wishes that Dorothy had been along on this journey since I would have liked to see Saw-Horse tell her off too.

The Marvelous Land of Oz by L. Frank Baum {Audio Book}

Eventually our trio gets to Emerald City and finds King Scarecrow who despite being the most wise ruler ever is actually still pretty dumb. There is a scene between Scarecrow and Pumpkinhead involving an interpreter that had me cracking up. I literally said out loud "How are they not realizing they are answering each other's questions and they don't need an interpreter? There General is Jinjur. Too bad the women want to also take Emerald city to take possession of the jewels to make bracelets and sell them for gowns. Because women just love sparkly things eyeroll.

Still you must surrender! You don't look it, said the Guardian, gazing from one to another, admiringly. Go home to your mothers, my good girls, and milk the cows, and bake the bread. Don't you know it's a dangerous thing to conquer a city? I wish at this moment that Jinjur had been replaced by Peggy Carter so she would have kicked his butt all over Emerald City. I quickly cheered though when the women took Emerald City and the Scarecrow flees to his friend, Emperor Tin Woodman who is ruling over the Quadlings. Eventually we have everyone meeting up again and deciding that their quest is to remove Jinjur from the throne and put the Scarecrow back in his rightful place.

Things do not go according to plan though. We meet even more characters and get an appearance by two characters from the last book, the Queen of the Mice and Glinda the good or as I started calling her Glinda who is a worse witch than even Katrina on Sleepy Hollow.

I have to say that Scarecrow was a jerk throughout this whole story and the Tin Woodman was pretty vain. I wonder how Dorothy would feel meeting up with this duo again and seeing how changed they became. Also they seem to have short term memories since they both got prissy with anyone who mentioned the Wizard of Oz being less than what he was.

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The Marvelous Land of Oz: Being an Account of the Further Adventures of the Scarecrow and the Tin Woodman, commonly shortened to The Land of Oz. The Marvelous Land of Oz is a musical play by Thomas W. Olson (book), Gary Briggle (lyrics), and Richard Dworsky (music), based on the novel by L. Frank.

You would think that one of them being so smart may have realized that the Wizard pulled one over on them as well. Ah well, maybe in the next book. My favorite character was honestly the Saw-Horse with Tip a close second. Jack Pumpkinhead kept whining about his head and spoiling and I wish someone had turned him into a pie man being sick has brought out an I am not in the mood attitude today.

The characters felt very real to me and I loved each one of them to pieces and had to crack up by how our merry group started working each other's nerves. I thought that was quite realistic since I probably would have peaced out a while ago and went somewhere to hang out with the China people. Additionally, I thought that this book flowed much better than book 1. Frank Baum knew how he was going to end it, the trick was getting from point A to point B.

The ending took me totally by surprised and I loved every minute of it. It's nice to not be spoiled by a book's ending and I was thrilled to not even guess at it. The ending makes perfect sense too and it also goes to show that the Wizard of Oz was more of a humbug than previously thought in book 1. If he ever shows up in Oz again, I hope that Glinda and crew kicks his butt. As much as I want to start reading book 3 right now I am going to wait to start when I get two other books from my pile done.

Jan 22, Jonathan Terrington rated it really liked it Shelves: Before I discovered that there was a girl named Dorothy with a dog called Toto I discovered the land of Oz. I never understood as a child the rules of series. That you 'had' to read the previous books before reading the second or third books. This was due to my age at the time things seem rather muddled as a 7 year old when you have a voracious appetite for reading and the fact that I had the tendency to grab whatever was on my bookshelf.

As far as stepping into the world of Oz went, this was Before I discovered that there was a girl named Dorothy with a dog called Toto I discovered the land of Oz. As far as stepping into the world of Oz went, this was not the worst place I could have begun. Though it takes place after The Wonderful Wizard of Oz this book easily stands alone, albeit that there are references which one would not understand without knowledge of the predecessor novel.

The plot, in which our male protagonist Tip, travels through Oz with a bunch of magical creatures and finds his way through several adventures is an interesting one. It certainly kept me enthralled several times as a child. However I missed out on all the metaphors and symbolism that Baum put into his work.

To this day, however I still wonder what Baum was doing with the gender change in this book. As a child I thought it was strange. Now, I still think it was a strange idea to have gender changing in a novel for children. It must be symbolic in some sense or else some parents would have complained. I certainly have no problems with allowing children of 6 or 7 to read them. Often many parents and adults will raise a fuss and claim that such novels will provide children with the wrong impressions.

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However I've found through experience that children are much more conscious than we realise and understand far more than given credit for. Children's novels like these are what they should be reading in my view.

The Marvelous Land of Oz

Apr 14, Lindsey rated it really liked it Shelves: I adored this book! Which was a bit of a shock to me, since I enjoyed the Oz books all right when I was younger, but I was bothered by the inconsistencies from one book to the next--I had that kind of mind even then. I saw the entire set for Kindle for a ridiculously low price, and I said, "Hey, they're classics. I'll probably read them again. When I was younger, I took the stories at face value.

A talking scarecrow, A gigantic conceited Wogglebug, a Cowardly Lion? It was just a story, easy to accept. So imagine my surprise when, from the lofty vantage point of almost-adulthood, I discovered that L. Frank Baum is insanely funny. His book is at heart a fairy story, yes, but it is bristling with satirical insights on the nature of man.

He weaves a fantastic, richly peopled, romanticized fairy world and then declines to take it at all seriously. The scene where the Scarecrow calls Jellia Jamb to interpret for him and Jack? And the Wogglebug was delicious, though I am glad he was not made into General Jinjur's goulash. Even dear Tin Man with his figurative heart of gold had a delightful dose of does one call it human? On the subject of General Jinjur. It amuses me that half of the reviewers mention that they appreciated the feminist element of the book, and the other half complain about Baum's female stereotypes.

Really, regardless of Baum's stance on women's suffrage, I don't see why a good children's book has to be dragged through disgusting political mire. Perhaps there is something to a child's way of taking things at face value that is as valuable as the insight born of worldly experience. I was surprised at how much I enjoyed this. It had some very interesting touches which, to my mind, made it more modern than perhaps it was intended to be. For instance, the whole role reversal thing which takes place in the Emerald City.

Another example was the Woggle Bug--easily my favourite character, and anyone who knows me well and has read the book can guess why! And please note that this appearance of this gigantic sentient insect predates that of Gregor Samsa in The Metamorphosis by more I was surprised at how much I enjoyed this. And please note that this appearance of this gigantic sentient insect predates that of Gregor Samsa in The Metamorphosis by more than a decade.