The Longevity Project: Surprising Discoveries for Health and Long Life from the Landmark Eight Decad


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Feb 28, Pages Buy. Mar 03, Pages Buy. Feb 28, Pages. Mar 03, Pages. Drawing from the most extensive study of long life ever conducted, The Longevity Project busts many long- held myths, revealing how:. With self-tests that illuminate your own best paths to longer life, this book changes the conversation about what it really takes to achieve a long, healthy life. This landmark study—which Dr. We have been told that the key to longevity involves obsessing over what we eat, how much we stress, and how fast we run. Based on the most extensive study of longevity ever conducted, The Longevity Project exposes what really impacts our lifespan-including friends, family, personality, and work.

Gathering new information and using modern statistics to study participants across eight decades, Dr. Howard Friedman and Dr. Leslie Martin bust myths about achieving health and long life. For example, people do not die from working long hours at a challenging job- many who worked the hardest lived the longest.

With questionnaires that help you determine where you are heading on the longevity spectrum and advice about how to stay healthy, this book changes the conversation about living a long, healthy life. Released in March of , this book tells of the "surprising discoveries for health and long life from the landmark eight-decade study" by Stanford psychologist Dr. What began with s Do you think you have the secrets to longevity? What began with some 1, boys and girls born around selected by Dr. Terman in ended, or should I say resulted in detailing factors such as social connections, personality and marriage affect long-term health in The Longevity Project.

Terman chose bright kids and tracked them throughout their lives. Over the years he collected information about the children and their families, how many books were in their houses, to their dispositions. Dr Terman died in at the age of 80, but the project was carried on by others. Friedman and Martin picked up on his work in , and used the decades of data gathered to better understand health and longevity.

Dr Martin explains that "by virtue of expecting good things to happen and feeling like nothing bad ever would, they predisposed themselves to be heavier drinkers, they tended to be smokers, and their hobbies were riskier. People and children who display prudence, persistence, organized lives are strong, healthier and live longer. Yep, that means those of us somewhat compulsive and not entirely carefree. The book is dotted with assessments used by Dr. Terman with his subjects, Termanites, over the years. So if you like that sort of Redbook, how do I rank questioning, you will enjoy these tests.

Are you smart, educated, pretty healthy and moderately content, then you will no doubt have read or will be reading this book and can "expect" to live a long life! Aug 26, Adam rated it it was amazing Shelves: As far as I know, you can't find this information in any other general-audience-accessible work on health psychology. This book has really important information that I think, like the authors, everyone should know. It is, however, pretty dry. It's very repetitive to hit home the important parts?

It also leaves a LOT of questions unanswered. Their amazing study, a looooooongitudinal correlational study, provides breadth In a nutshell: Their amazing study, a looooooongitudinal correlational study, provides breadth but not depth. For instance, they discuss how conscientiousness leads to a longer life. They don't, however, offer mechanisms - beyond a conscientious person being more likely to take pills.

To me, this is akin to saying "people with blue shirts live longer.

But what is it about blue shirts? Does the dye in the fabric make people healthier? Are healthy people more likely to buy blue shirts? Do blue shirts make the social environment friendlier? Those are the types of questions that won't be answered - about conscientiousness, married life, social support, and all of the other extremely interesting correlates they bring up.

I was irritated in the chapter on fitness that they really downplayed the importance of exercise.

8 editions of this work

The Longevity Project: Surprising Discoveries for Health and Long Life from the Landmark Eight-Decade Study [Howard S. Friedman, Leslie R. Martin] on. The Longevity Project: Surprising Discoveries for Health and Long Life from the Landmark Eight-Decade S tudy [Howard S. Friedman, Leslie R. Martin] on.

To my knowledge, most medical doctors encourage moderately rigorous exercise at least three times per week. This book, to the contrary, generally recommends gardening and bowling with other people. I agree with their reasoning, but I don't think the vast majority of people need to worry about overdoing it. Other than the aforementioned, the book is good. Aug 16, Emily rated it liked it. This was an interesting book that summarized an 80 year long study on longevity. Around the 's a doctor named Terman started studying about 1, elementary aged kids and interviewed them consistently throughout their lives.

After he died, his colleagues continued the study and culminated the data into this book. The results weren't too surprising to me overall, and it got a little repetitive at times.

One of the most interesting points they made was that certain kinds of stress are actually This was an interesting book that summarized an 80 year long study on longevity. One of the most interesting points they made was that certain kinds of stress are actually good for you, and some of the longest lived participants were those working in high pressure, nationally important positions.

Going through a divorce is not good stress and depending on gender can significantly change your longevity. Exercising is good for you too, but you don't have to run marathons or be an Olympian to be healthy. Since the majority of this study took place before things like trail running and triathalons were popular, it showed that the participants weren't necessarily doing more than consistently gardening or walking to the store and that was adequate activity for maintaining their health.

Overall it was interesting to read about but a little long winded for me.

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Jun 13, Marilyn rated it liked it. These authors picked up Dr. Terman's longitudinal study data Terman was looking for the effects of IQ on success in life, among other things and looked for the factors that surrounded those that lived the longest and best i. The people who were "prudent, persistent and well-organized" lived the longest and best. They were happy and laughed becau These authors picked up Dr. They were happy and laughed because they were healthy and wealthy and wise. Set out to create the life you want most and enjoy all the fallout of those decisions. They found that besides being "prudent, persistent and well-organized" i.

They suggest that women live longer and better because social networks are what women do naturally. Divorced men in particular did not fare well because losing their wife meant they also lost their friends. This was an interesting read. Jul 05, Nancy rated it really liked it Shelves: The Longevity Project is an interesting book reporting research on a wide range of factors that the authors studied for their effect on longevity. The authors write in a breezy entertaining style including lots of quizzes you can take to see how you rank for the studied attributes. The basis of the research is a group of bright children born in the early s and followed until their deaths.

There really are not lots of surprises, but there were a few that surprised me. Finding out what makes a lot of difference and what is just little is useful. Besides, different factors may surprise you. Apr 19, John Waterman rated it really liked it. This is a very interesting book about how long you might expect to live based on the choices you make regarding how you live your life. It is a scientific analysis of data collected over a lifetime of study by Dr.

The Longevity Project Surprising Discoveries for Health and Long Life from the Landmark Eight Decade

Terman, who began his research in the early 's, and is followed up by the extensive modern-day research by the authors. The book debunks many of the popular ideas in our society today, such as "eat your spinach. I would recommend this book to anyone who has curiosity in the realms of psychology and human behavior.

The Longevity Project by Howard S. Friedman Ph.D., Leslie R. Martin Ph.D. | reinforcedearth.com.my

Mar 13, Leah rated it liked it Shelves: Stumbled on this book accidentally but found myself engrossed in it. I still think while the study went on extensively, that it needs to be taken with a grain of salt. Predicting factors of longevity are good but no two bodies are the same and what one person thrives on may not be the same for another.

Still a fascinating read. Jul 29, Rosalie rated it it was amazing. I thought the various study findings throughout the book were fascinating. Mar 24, Lance rated it really liked it.

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The authors did a fantastic job of collating and parsing data from a study on aging that started in The lessons learned tend to defy modern wisdom in many respects, but seem more in line with what most of us observe every day. I read the book as part of a course on Aging Policy. The book contains a number of interesting little quizzes which are fun and possibly insightful. Would I recommend the book? It's a great way to get oneself re-grounded from all the hullabaloo we are taugh The authors did a fantastic job of collating and parsing data from a study on aging that started in It's a great way to get oneself re-grounded from all the hullabaloo we are taught today to assist us in living longer.

Every day a person can go out on the internet and find a new study that purports this or that thing which is exactly the opposite of something told us just days before. For example, three days ago I found a professional study that shows bacon is a health food. I'll buy into that study. Another article showed that leafy salad - the kind in prepackaged bags - is probably worse for a person than a cheeseburger because of bacteria on the leaves. Would you be surprised to find all of that sort of thing is irrelevant?

Would you be surprised to find that hours in the gym, extreme skill with watching ones weight and counting calories and running miles after grueling mile may, in fact, have no effect on how long you live? Would it surprise you to find that conscientiousness, good relationships and personal fulfillment go a much longer way to determining how long you will live and how healthy you'll remain as you age? I think you'll find it somewhat long-winded, but ultimately fascinating.

Apr 16, David rated it really liked it Shelves: The longevity project was a long-term sociological study that began in Fifteen-hundred children were selected for the study, which continued for 80 years! A massive amount of data was collected on each of the study participants, yielding a treasure trove of information to be gleaned and organized. Paying close attention to the difference between "correlation" and "causation", numerous scholars, psychologists, and medical researchers have found some extremely interesting patterns in the fac The longevity project was a long-term sociological study that began in Paying close attention to the difference between "correlation" and "causation", numerous scholars, psychologists, and medical researchers have found some extremely interesting patterns in the factors that affect longevity.

What sort of surprises?

Conscientious people tend to live longer than care-free people. Being married doesn't help women live longer--but it does help men. Being religious, per se, does not assist longevity, but having lots of social connections in a religious congregation does. Both women and men who have feminine attributes live longer than those with masculine attributes. The early death of a parent has no statistical effect on longevity; but having parents who divorce has a significant effect. All of these interesting results, plus many more are described in this book. In addition, there are many self-quizzes that help you to gauge where you fall in each area.

This isn't really a "self-help" type of book. But it does shed light on the manifold factors that affect longevity. Aug 06, Ann rated it really liked it. Fascinating perspective on many simple beliefs of our society. Reminds me of Freakonomics in the way things are connected unexpectedly.

Surprising Discoveries for Health and Long Life from the Landmark Eight-Decade S tudy

It starts a bit dry, and definitely could have been better edited. This is one of those books that I might just recommend to my doctors, counselor or just someone that wants a different perspective of our society. Almost feel like reading again to get the full exposure. One of the takeaways that I enjoyed was the idea of our society's desire to give you com Huh. One of the takeaways that I enjoyed was the idea of our society's desire to give you commands to live longer, like to exercise or eat less, etc.

For example, running an hour a day if you don't like running will likely extend your life just long enough as the time it took you to exercise. So find more active activities for you that you enjoy doing and that you're likely to do with little resistance. But having a large social network, engaging in physical activities that naturally draw you in, giving back to your community, enjoying and thriving in your career, and nurturing a healthy marriage or close friendships can do more than add many years to your life.

Sep 19, Jennifer rated it it was amazing Shelves: This book is really unique, since it came from a study that followed its participants for basically their whole lives. Eight decades of data. Terman began the study by selecting young children who showed early signs of high intelligence, and gathering every bit of data that he could on them.

The subjects are often laughingly referred to as "Termites. Terman could not complete the study himself, and there were many researchers along the way, known as "Termi This book is really unique, since it came from a study that followed its participants for basically their whole lives. Terman could not complete the study himself, and there were many researchers along the way, known as "Terminators.

The Longevity Project

Because it lasted so long, it gave the very unique window to see what sorts of personality traits, identified in childhood, corresponded with longest life outcomes. Of course, there were many more details than that, but if you are conscientious enough to care about details, I guess you'll want to read the book anyway.

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Stressful careers unless it's literally a battle field! Oct 15, Victoria rated it it was ok. There, I saved you a few hours; don't thank me, just send money. No trivia or quizzes yet. One of the takeaways that I enjoyed was the idea of our society's desire to give you commands to live longer, like to exercise or eat less, etc.

Jul 12, Paul rated it it was amazing. An amazing body of data went into these results--which are presented clearly, with lots of examples. Some of the findings are common sense, but more of them are surprises at least to social science types like me. There are some answers that you can't get without waiting for decades, and these data were worth the wait. It's made me reconsider some parts of my life. As someone who loves data, I would have liked more numbers. But for most readers, given the level of statistics involved, that woul An amazing body of data went into these results--which are presented clearly, with lots of examples.

But for most readers, given the level of statistics involved, that would have been more of a distraction than a help. My only significant critiques were a result of listening to the audible version rather than reading the print version, primarily that the personality or other scales given in the book are very difficult to use when read.