Literature, Satire and the Early Stuart State


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Project MUSE Mission Project MUSE promotes the creation and dissemination of essential humanities and social science resources through collaboration with libraries, publishers, and scholars worldwide. These are the unauthorised texts of early Stuart England. Open global navigation Cambridge University Press Academic. This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. While not inclined to say [End Page ] that "satire was necessarily 'oppositional,'" he maintains that it "provided a vehicle through which existing political discourse could be fractured and reset. Even more so was McRae's reference in the preliminaries to a forthcoming edition of these inaccessible works in Early Modern Literary Studies. Overall McRae pays attention to the tone and precise implications of the chosen libels, some of which, such as Corbett's 'Against the Opposing of the Duke', must have presented real challenges.

As McRae points out, this latter combines 'the topicality of news' with Corbett's 'familiar spectre of socio-political inversion' to provide 'subtle commentary on the intertwined ideological issues that dominated the early Caroline If you would like to authenticate using a different subscribed institution that supports Shibboleth authentication or have your own login and password to Project MUSE, click 'Authenticate'. View freely available titles: Book titles OR Journal titles. Project MUSE promotes the creation and dissemination of essential humanities and social science resources through collaboration with libraries, publishers, and scholars worldwide.

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  • A review of "Literature, Satire and the Early Stuart State." by Andrew McRae.

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He argues that the most influential and incisive political satire in this period may be found in manuscript libels, scurrilous pamphlets and a range of other material written and circulated under the threat of censorship. These are the unauthorised texts of early Stuart England.

From his analysis of these texts, McRae argues that satire, as the pre-eminent literary mode of discrimination and stigmatisation, helped people make sense of the confusing political conditions of the early Stuart era. It did so partly through personal attacks and partly also through sophisticated interventions into ongoing political and ideological debates. In such forms satire provided resources through which contemporary writers could define new models of political identity and construct new discourses of dissent. This book wil be of interest to political and literary historians alike.

A review of "Literature, Satire and the Early Stuart State." by Andrew McRae

The culture of early Stuart libelling 2. Freeing the tongue and the heart: The Politics of Division: Richard Corbett and early Stuart Royalism 6. Puritanism and politics in the s Epilogue: He is the author of God Speed the Plough: This title is available for institutional purchase via Cambridge Core Cambridge Core offers access to academic eBooks from our world-renowned publishing programme.

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Your eBook purchase and download will be completed by our partner www. This study focuses on "a wealth of relatively untouched material" that relates to politics in the early Stuart period vi.

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These are the unauthorised texts of early Stuart England. From his analysis of these texts, McRae argues that satire, as the pre-eminent literary mode of. Literature, Satire and the Early Stuart State. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, x + pp. index. bibl. $ ISBN: 0–– –2.

It explores matters of literary history by asking "what happened to satire in the decades after the Bishops' Ban of ," which ended the "outpouring of verse satire" by such writers as Donne, Marston, and Hall; and it examines issues in political history by investigating "changes in the language of politics, which enabled the articulation of radical new notions of ideological difference and political confrontation" 1.

Suggesting that early Stuart satire has "somehow faded into the background" in recent decades, leaving readers "heavily reliant on formalist and New Critical studies" produced before New Historicism became the fashion, McRae "sets aside the concern with textual form" that has been the focus of "many studies of literary genre" and presents "a historicized study" of satire "not in accordance with neoclassical standards and conventions, but rather as a 'mode'" or "an attitude or an inflection" that pervaded many different kinds of works 2—4.

Literature, Satire and the Early Stuart State

Throughout his historicized study of satire, McRae makes generalizations about the development of satire in the early Stuart period that are tied closely to a particular narrative of changes in the political culture of the era that this study privileges. Unlike some revisionist historians, however, McRae does not find the same commitment to consensus in the early Stuart era as he assumes there was among the Elizabethans. In examining the unauthorized texts that the early Stuarts produced, McRae locates a range of writing "that rejects the dominant assumption" that "all authority to speak was derived from the monarch" and identifies "many" writers who "rejected the system's constraints, and constructed new modes of illicit expression" 2.

On the basis of these findings, McRae concludes that much of satire in early Stuart era was an intervention in the political discourse of the period.

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While not inclined to say [End Page ] that "satire was necessarily 'oppositional,'" he maintains that it "provided a vehicle through which existing political discourse could be fractured and reset. Just as McRae's narrative of political change is intent on modifying certain revisionist accounts of early Stuart consensus, so is he uneasy about recent views on censorship that are indebted to such accounts.