Phineas Gage: A Gruesome but True Story About Brain Science


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Phineas Gage: A Gruesome but True Story About Brain Science [John Fleischman] on reinforcedearth.com.my *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Phineas Gage was. reinforcedearth.com.my: Phineas Gage: A Gruesome but True Story About Brain Science ( Audible Audio Edition): John Fleischman, Kevin Orton, Recorded Books: Books.

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Why Scientists Are Still Fascinated By Phineas Gage

Transcript of Phineas Gage: Star Rating Characters View this short powtoon to find out: Conflict Watch this Powtoon to find out! To share the tragic but interesting story Conclusion Watch this Powtoon to figure out what happened: John Fleischman Book Report Presentation: Nonfiction , Brain Science Lexile Number: Background I was intrigued to read this book when I saw the cover.

When I started reading, it started to get really interesting. I was amazed, so I wanted to share the story. I would rate this book 4. Some parts were complicated- about brain science. Otherwise, the book was easy to understand; well explained.

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I would recommend this book to: This story amused me. This story is accessible to any level reader and I would recommend it to anyone who's ever heard of Phineas Gage. I could see this being a great book for teachers at the middle or high school level. It's just a crazy interesting story.

Jun 03, Lindsey Jones rated it it was amazing Shelves: History, science, and psychology collide in this short, engaging read! The story of Phineas Gage is fascinating: Fleischman does a great job of interweaving Gage's story with scientific explanations and historical medical developments. This writing style will enable young readers to make sense of technical content due to relevance.

The inclusion of images ar History, science, and psychology collide in this short, engaging read! The inclusion of images are also crucial in making meaning of this text, and this book certainly delivers some gruesome images! What middle schooler wouldn't want to read this book? It would be my hopes that Gage's accident draws them in, but what they learn about brain science intrigues them and sets them on a path of inquiry. I would highly recommend this book for classroom use, particularly at the middle school level.

Nov 25, Mary rated it really liked it Shelves: I really enjoyed this book and will have my children read it, but we will be discussing one aspect of it for sure. The author said that "Humans have always argued about what makes us human. Our frontal lobes are not what makes us human. Would we say a brain injured dog is something other than a dog?

A brain injured horse is not a I really enjoyed this book and will have my children read it, but we will be discussing one aspect of it for sure. A brain injured horse is not a horse? A human is a human from conception to death because we are humans. Brain injury or abnormality does not make us any less human. No other deformity makes us any less human. We are created in the image of God. Every single human being is. That is why we need to treat every one with respect and give them the dignity that is due them.

Any of us could be brain injured in an instant during our lives. Our humanity needs to be respected and protected at any age. Jan 19, Brianna Preston rated it really liked it. A short but engaging read in simple terms about what we've learned over the years about the brain.

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How did Phineas Gage survive, and what altered him so dramatically? Aug 08, Heather Carreiro rated it it was amazing. Love teaching this in middle school. Mar 02, Kim rated it liked it. Biography, Nonfiction Awards won: This is a book that has received many literary awards including ALA best book for young adults in Wilmington Area seventh grade curriculum requires this book as a part of their biography unit.

Follett indicates the reading level as 7. A Gruesome but True Story about Brain Science takes place in Cavendish, Vermont, and begins with Phineas Gage who is a twenty-six year old blasting expert that worked for the railroad in On the fateful September 13th day, there was a freak accident that sent a three foot, thirteen and a half pound spear like tamper through Phineas's cheekbone and out the top of his skull.

Phineas miraculously never loses consciousness and received nineteenth century medical care from Dr. The nineteenth century produced ideas on how the brain worked and how the different parts of the brain controlled different parts of the body, personality, and social skills. Harlow presents his astounding medical findings to skeptical Harvard and Boston Medical School doctors and interns where they study Phineas until he leaves and joins up with P.

The story is hard to follow at times because it spans many decades. Historical photographs with descriptive captions are used throughout including a modern computer generated picture of Phineas skull showing the passageway of the rod through his skull. Diagrams and drawings depict how the brain works.

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Pen and watercolor drawings along with prints aid in the clarification of this story. A glossary, resource listing, and index are also included.

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The story of Phineas Gage's lack powder accident is compelling. The format is very easy to follow, and there are great supporting photographs and diagrams. The story is a confusing mix of reading levels--some parts would appeal to a fifth grader while other parts are more appropriate for a high school anatomy class. This is a very interesting true story that would be most appropriate for middle school and up, especially for those interested in anatomy and medicine. Interesting children's book on this ever fascinating story. He died when he was 36 from an epileptic seizure that was almost surely related to his injury.

ALA Book Picks School Library Journal, 49 3 , Mar 09, Lauma rated it liked it Shelves: I am very interested in brain science and have read several adult books on the subject. I was excited to see a book that introduced this topic to young adult readers. However, I think most children would be primarily drawn in with the title and illustration on the cover and want to read about the gory details, rather than learning about the brain research that came from studying the 11 years that Phineas Gage survived after a metal rod was driven through his skull in a railroad construction acci I am very interested in brain science and have read several adult books on the subject.

However, I think most children would be primarily drawn in with the title and illustration on the cover and want to read about the gory details, rather than learning about the brain research that came from studying the 11 years that Phineas Gage survived after a metal rod was driven through his skull in a railroad construction accident in The story is a confusing mix of reading levels--some parts would appeal to a fifth grader while other parts are more appropriate for a high school anatomy class.

The vocabulary is difficult and the concepts are complex. For example, the author begins the explanation of the brain in general terms, "Imagine you could click open the top of your head and lift your brain out. The author also tried to provide some historical background knowledge, but frequently skipped around time periods that could confuse a young reader.

This is a very interesting true story that would be most appropriate for middle school and up, especially for those interested in anatomy and medicine. Nov 08, NS Lauren rated it liked it Shelves: A railroad construction foreman, Phineas was blasting rock near Cavendish, Vermont, in when a thirteen-pound iron rod was shot through his brain. Miraculously, he survived another eleven years and became a textbook case in brain science. But he was forever changed by the accident, and what happened inside his brain will tell you a lot about how your brain works and what makes us who we are.

This informational book about the evolution of brain science is certain to grab readers' attention from the start with its gruesome front cover illustration of Phineas' battered skull. In addition to keeping the reader engaged with dozens of flinch-inducing photographs and diagrams, these graphics provide a tremendous support to the reader in understanding complex concepts of brain science. The author organizes information chronologically into chapters, and provides textual supports such as detailed captions and a glossary of terms.

One support that was missing, however, was a timeline of brain research. Though the author uses expository text to explain the Gage case in the context of discoveries to come, a timeline of major discoveries would have been a helpful, visual tool to refer to while reading. A strength of this book is its powerful hook to engage readers in critical thinking skills of drawing conclusions and identifying causes and effects. Jan 16, Laurel rated it really liked it Shelves: This is the true story of Phineas Gage, a railroad worker in the mid 's who suffered a brain injury after a 3-foot iron rod shot through his head.

He not only survived, but at least initially appeared to be physically unaffected. That is, he could still walk, talk and perform normal daily tasks as usual. But he was not the same man. Once even-tempered, he now seemed to lack social skills, and often broke out in an unexpected temper. Gage is one of the earliest documented cases of severe br This is the true story of Phineas Gage, a railroad worker in the mid 's who suffered a brain injury after a 3-foot iron rod shot through his head.

Phineas Gage: A Gruesome But True Story about Brain Science - John Fleischman - Google Книги

Gage is one of the earliest documented cases of severe brain injury, ultimately changing the way doctors understood the brain and how it functioned. This short book takes a look at those shifting ideas, and at the early years of brain science. It is geared towards kids, and does a good job at relating to the target audience while also being educational. A quick and rather fascinating read. I still don't like the cover, though. View all 5 comments. This thorough book, for ages 10 and up, offers a glimpse into the life of the famous subject as well as great science info on the brain, a bit of science history, and a bit of investigation into some of the mysteries surrounding Phineas Gage after his injury.

The format is very easy to follow, and there are great supporting photographs and diagrams. The author avoided turning the story into a science textbook and instead manages to adopt an interesting story-telling style when necessary to keep This thorough book, for ages 10 and up, offers a glimpse into the life of the famous subject as well as great science info on the brain, a bit of science history, and a bit of investigation into some of the mysteries surrounding Phineas Gage after his injury.

The author avoided turning the story into a science textbook and instead manages to adopt an interesting story-telling style when necessary to keep us engaged. The modern science techniques detailed confirm just how "lucky" Gage was to survive, and what his injury taught the medical world about the human brain. May 24, Nancy rated it really liked it. This was a very short, 96 pages, but powerfully good book.

If you are interested in the science of the brain, and in wonderfully well written, unique medical mystery stories It is set in the mid 's and has some wonderful illustrations and information along with the story. I will also be checking out the website recommended by the author for more "Neuroscience for Kids. Oliver Sachs books, much weightier reads of course, this is o This was a very short, 96 pages, but powerfully good book.

Oliver Sachs books, much weightier reads of course, this is one my new favorites. Aug 08, Linda rated it really liked it.

Phineas Gage: A Gruesome But True Story about Brain Science

Ok, so this is a kid's book but it sure made brain science clear to me. Before Phineas Gage accidently shot a thirteen pound tamping rod through his brain in , and survived, practically nothing was known about the brain. This short book,75 pages, describes Phineas' accident and medical care along with practically the entire history of medicine. Fascinating and a lot of information packed into a quick, easy to understand read. How many neurons do we have in our brains? Ten billio Ok, so this is a kid's book but it sure made brain science clear to me.

Jan 17, Matthyas rated it it was amazing. The book Phineas Gage: The book goes on to find out how Phineas Gage had survived the rod through his head. Going throughout the book all about the old beliefs of brain science and the newest beliefs of the brain. Read tht ebook to find out more about this true, fascinating story.

Jun 05, Kara rated it it was amazing Shelves: Teachers - please put this book in the hands of any student interested in science. It breaks down the very cool things the brain can do into a middle school reading level, but absolutely stuffed full of cool facts, pictures, drawings, history and the beginnings of Modern Science, all on a very human level. Sep 10, Suzanne rated it liked it. Very interesting but definitely not an easy read. This book tells the true story of a man who had a steel rod impaled through his head and survived.

It also looks at the science behind how he could survive and the reasons for the personality changes he underwent. This is on a middle school reading list, but the science is a stretch for their comprehension. Jun 05, Tracy rated it really liked it Recommends it for: Chris Swensen, Jeff, Corbin. Got this for Ryan and ended up reading it myself.

It's a true story about a man who had a tamping iron basically a pike shot thru his head in a railroad building accident.

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He lived, and his case is now a very famous study for brain science. Ryan gave it four and a half stars. Jun 17, jmjester rated it it was amazing Shelves: It's gruesome enough to suck you in, contains just the right amount of information on brain science and its history to challenge our students, and is engaging in manner. If Fleischman decides to write other middle grade books, I'm in. Sep 26, Malorie Demo rated it it was ok. Interesting children's book on this ever fascinating story. Well, probably not post-head trauma Phineas. Aug 02, Renae rated it really liked it Recommends it for: Interesting and a bit disturbing May 16, Brooke Bischoff rated it it was ok.

Phineas Gage, truly a man with a hole in his head. Working just like most people do everyday, Phineas was just having an off day on September 13, He was a railroad construction foreman and had been doing the same job for a while and became pretty much a pro at what he did. But instead of having everything run smoothly, something goes wrong. As some of his co-workers look over they see Phineas with a thirteen-pound iron rod that was shot right through his brain.

When and if I actually read a book, they usually pull me in, but this one, I wasn't feeling it. There are many places in this book where it constantly keeps talking about the facts of the brain rather than just facts about Phineas or more about what actually happened. The cortex is where you actually see what your eyes transmit, smell what your nose senses, taste what your tongue samples, touch what your nerves report…..

I got lucky because I do find interest in medical related topics but say if I were someone reading this with no medical interest what so ever, I would most definitely put it back on the shelves. The book was honestly so hard to read and understand since I didn't know too much about the brain. Every book is going to have good reviews and bad reviews. But on the other hand, I would recommend it to people who love to learn about medical topics. I feel this book should be read by more adults rather than young children because some of the information is complex, so children might have a hard time understanding the text.